Missing Information Regarding Vitamin D in “Fluid of Life”

A major problem we have in life is the inability to ask questions we don’t know to ask. I discuss this in my recent book, Fluid of Life – What doctors never told me about my blood.

As if to prove this point, a week after this book launched, material I was reading inspired me to ask a question. That question provided an answer that if I had thought about it, I would have guessed it. However, I never knew to ask, so I hadn’t thought about it.

The question was: Do chickens that get exposed to sunlight have more Vitamin D in their eggs than chickens raised in enclosed facilities?

I asked this question because Vitamin D is essential to our over-all health, and it plays a role in iron absorption. One of the foods said to contain Vitamin D naturally is eggs. According to a simple search online, 1 large raw egg has 41 IU of Vitamin D. Preparing it changes this slightly, but not a lot.

However, that’s not the full story. When I looked for answers to my question, I found various ones, but they all said the same thing: chickens exposed to sunlight produce eggs with higher Vitamin D.

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Book Launch: “Fluid of Life”

Today is launch day! Fluid of Life – What doctors never told me about my blood by Diana Tibert is now available.

If you’ve ever felt tired for no reason and are otherwise healthy, this book may unlock the mystery behind your lack of energy. It’s a quick read, packed with wisdom gained by suffering for almost 20 years from exhaustion that translated into irritability, depression and weight gain. If you want to change your life, you’ll love Diana Tibert’s insight to women’s health.

Fluid of Life is Diana’s journey to learn about anemia and how it affected her body. The book contains information on blood health every woman in mid-life needs. Diana shares the pieces of the puzzle that empowered her to regain control of her life, to disperse the fog and start living. These were key pieces not given during her many doctor visits.

In Fluid of Life, you’ll discover:

  • which blood tests accurately measure blood levels
  • which foods help and hinder the health of your blood
  • what you can do today to start feeling better
  • the symptoms of low iron
  • how to improve your health by monitoring iron levels, and much more

Get your copy today.

Available Formats

Paperback (ISBN: 978-1-927625-75-0; 72 pages; 8.5×5.5 inches) available at Amazon

eBook (ISBN: 978-1-927625-74-3; 16,703 words) available at Amazon

This title is available to Kindle Unlimited Members.

“Fluid of Life” by Diana Tibert

COMING SOON: Diana Tibert’s Fluid of Life. A little book that may change your life.

For almost 40 years, Diana has struggled with low iron. It wasn’t a problem when she was younger and before she had children but shortly after her second child was born, she felt drained. Doctors and blood tests found nothing wrong; she was only borderline anemic.

During hospital visits to give birth to three children and to remove her gallbladder, she found nuggets of wisdom that helped her live with anemia. It wasn’t until a friend suffered a life-threatening health issue with her blood, that Diana found the true source of her problem. Once identified, the battle began.

Fluid of Life is Diana’s journey to learn about anemia and how it affected her body. The book contains information on blood health every woman in mid-life needs. Diana shares the pieces of the puzzle that empowered her to regain control of her life, to disperse the fog and start living. These were key pieces not given during her many doctor visits.

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From the “Fluid of Life” by Diana Tibert

Fluid of Life – What doctors never told me about my blood tells the story of Diana Tibert’s experience of living with anemia. Here’s a clip from the first chapter.

My First Blood Test

I was a healthy child and teen, so my parents saw no need to take me to the doctor’s office for a check-up. We didn’t go unless there was a problem. After all, it cost money to visit a doctor back then, and we were poor. The two dollar-service fee could buy a lot of food in the 60s and 70s and with 12 mouths to feed, every penny was needed.

I was in grade 11 or 12 when I had my first blood test, which really wasn’t a blood test at all. The organisation in Nova Scotia that did blood drives in the early 80s came to our high school and set up a blood-donor clinic in our gymnasium. I heard the rumour that if we gave blood, we could skip class. What teen doesn’t want to miss class?

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