Two Paths to Completing that First Draft

Coming Soon

The first draft of any novel is like climbing a mountain that has its peak concealed in thick clouds. Many people start writing it but few finish. There’s many reasons for the lack of success. If you’ve completed your first draft, congratulations. Take a moment and bathe in the beauty of reaching the top of the mountain, breaking through the cloud cover and feeling the sun on your skin.

While writers may not understand why they failed to finish the first draft, one reason might be the use of the wrong technique. There are as many ways to write a book as there are writers. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. You have to find your way to write the novel. It won’t be the way your English teacher told you how to do it. It won’t be the way the famous writer you met at his book signing did it. The author giving the workshop in the community hall has a different way than you to write a novel.

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Upcoming Book: Write that First Draft Free Style

How are  novels written? This question has been asked for years. How do you write a novel? Well, everyone writes it differently, so there’s no concrete rules. That’s the hard part; you have to figure out how to write one on your own. However, there are methods to help writers on their journey. They are as different as the types of books on a library shelf. Ideally, a writer tries several, sees what works for them, or takes a little bit from each process and creates their own.

There is no right or wrong way to write a novel. It can be written with one sentence a day or 5,000 words a day. It can take ten days or ten years to write. It can be written in a word processing document on the computer or with a pen or pencil on paper, lined or unlined. It can even be written in crayon on the inside of cereal boxes.

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A Name is Still a Name by Any Other Name

Roots to the PastThe following genealogy article was written by Diana Tibert, the genealogy columnist for The Citizen (Amherst, NS) and The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County, NS) and author of Roots to the Past. It appeared in newspapers in January 2006.

Quarter Castle Publishing will publish Tibert’s columns in book form. Roots to the Past – Book 1 will be released in late 2018. It will contain columns written from October 2005 (when the column began) to December 2006.  Stay tuned to learn more about this book as the release date approaches.

A Name is Still a Name by Any Other Name

Diana Tibert

William and John TypertPhoto: My grandfather William (right) had a few nicknames, including Wil, Bamp and Pop. His son, John, was recorded in the family Bible as William John, but was later known as John William (1942).

While growing up in Nova Scotia, I had three friends by the name of Michael. At an early age, they were given their own variation of Michael in the neighbourhood so everyone knew which Michael was being talked about without adding last names: Michael (who sometimes was called only by his last name: Harrison), Mike and Mikey.

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Not Enough Blood

Diana Tibert admits upfront that, “I am NOT a doctor. I am NOT a nurse or a medical practitioner of any type. I have no formal education in the medical field.”

But she has a problem, one that started in her late 30s. In her upcoming book, she tells her story in simple terms because there is no need for text-book language when the message is meant for the common person.

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Catholic Irish and Protestant Irish in Canada

Roots to the PastThe following genealogy article was written by Diana Tibert, the genealogy columnist for The Citizen (Amherst, NS) and The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County, NS) and author of Roots to the Past. It appeared in newspapers in 2016.

Quarter Castle Publishing will publish Tibert’s columns in book form. Roots to the Past – Book 1 will be released in late 2018. It will contain columns written from October 2005 (when the column began) to December 2006.  Stay tuned to learn more about this book as the release date approaches.

shamrockHappy St. Patrick’s Day

Catholic Irish and Protestant Irish in Canada

Diana Tibert

I haven’t studied any religion in depth. I’m more of a browser, reading bits and pieces of various religions and cults that have been created over the centuries to try to understand why people lived the way they did. With this curiosity, I began reading about the religions that separated the Irish.

During most of my early life, I heard news reports about Catholics and Protestants battling in Northern Ireland. When I was younger, I thought they were stories from long ago because no one in my small world hated another simply because of their religion.

As a young teen in the late 70s, I learned the stories were current and told about a religious war fought in the modern-day world. It was foreign to me, and I couldn’t wrap my brain around it because—to my knowledge—it didn’t happen in Canada. Why couldn’t they just get along?

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